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Indication of Te segregation in laser-irradiated ZnTe observed by in situ coherent-phonon spectroscopy

MPG-Autoren
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Shimada,  Toru
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Hirosaki University;

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Kamaraju,  Natarajan
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies;

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Wolf,  Martin
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Kampfrath,  Tobias
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Shimada, T., Kamaraju, N., Frischkorn, C., Wolf, M., & Kampfrath, T. (2014). Indication of Te segregation in laser-irradiated ZnTe observed by in situ coherent-phonon spectroscopy. Applied Physics Letters, 105(11): 111908. doi:10.1063/1.4896039.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-D7C8-7
Zusammenfassung
We irradiate a ZnTe single crystal with 10-fs laser pulses at a repetition rate of 80 MHz and investigate its resulting gradual modification by means of coherent-phonon spectroscopy. We observe the emergence of a phonon mode at about 3.6 THz whose amplitude and lifetime grow monotonously with irradiation time. The speed of this process depends sensitively on the pump-pulse duration. Our observations strongly indicate that the emerging phonon mode arises from a Te phase induced by multiphoton absorption of incident laser pulses. A potential application of our findings is laser-machining of microstructures in the bulk of a ZnTe crystal, a highly relevant electrooptic material.