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Journal Article

The Fermi Bubbles Revisited

MPS-Authors
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Yang,  Rui-zhi
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;
Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 21008 Nanjing, PR China;

/persons/resource/persons30244

Aharonian,  Felix A.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;
Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, 2 Dublin, Ireland;
Gran Sasso Science Institute, 7 viale Francesco Crispi, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy;

/persons/resource/persons30384

Crocker,  Roland
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;
Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, 2611 Canberra, Australia;

External Ressource
Fulltext (public)

1402.0403.pdf
(Preprint), 897KB

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Citation

Yang, R.-z., Aharonian, F. A., & Crocker, R. (2014). The Fermi Bubbles Revisited. Astrophysics & Astronomy, 567: A19. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201423562.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-27A9-6
Abstract
We analyze 60 months of all sky data from the Fermi-LAT. The Fermi Bubble structures discovered previously are clearly revealed by our analysis. With more data and, consequently, better statistics we can now divide each bubble into constant longitude slices to investigate their gross $\gamma$-ray spectral morphology. While the detailed spectral behaviour of each slice derived within our analysis is somewhat dependent on the assumed background model, we find, robustly, a relative deficit of the flux at low energies (i.e., hardening) towards the top of the South Bubble. In neither Bubble does the spectrum soften with longitude. The morphology of the Fermi Bubbles is also revealed to be energy dependent: at high energies they are more extended. We conclude from the gamma-ray spectrum at high latitudes that a low energy break in the parent cosmic ray population is required in both leptonic and hadronic models. We briefly discuss possible leptonic and hadronic interpretation of this phenomenology.