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Techniques for analyzing the early stages of crystallization reactions

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Schüth,  Ferdi
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Bussian,  P.
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Ågren,  P.
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Schunk,  S.
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;
hteAG, Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg, Germany;

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Linden,  M.
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;
Department of Physical Chemistry, Abo Akademi University, Porthansgatan 3-5, 20500 Abo (Turku), Finland;

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Citation

Schüth, F., Bussian, P., Ågren, P., Schunk, S., & Linden, M. (2001). Techniques for analyzing the early stages of crystallization reactions. Solid State Sciences, 3(7), 801-808. doi:0.1016/S1293-2558(01)01199-2.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-2FCA-7
Abstract
This paper will — in a semi-review-like form — describe the problems in analyzing nucleation reactions, and approaches towards a solution of these problems. Attempts to pinpoint the nucleation event can start from the solution state, and the development of precursors for the solid state can be traced with mass spectrometry. Alternatively, one can try to obtain information on ever earlier stages of the solids formation itself, thus approaching the nucleation event from the side of the solid already formed. A highly suitable tool for this purpose is a tubular reactor, where crystallization reactions can be carried out continuously.