English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Phase Behavior and Wall Formation in Zr(SO4)2/CTABr and TiOSO4/CTABr Mesophases

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons58760

Linden,  Mika
Department of Physical Chemistry, Åbo Akademi, Portansgatan 3-5, 20500 Turku, Finland;
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58984

Schunk,  S.
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58985

Schüth,  Ferdi
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Linden, M., Blanchard, J., Schacht, S., Schunk, S., & Schüth, F. (1999). Phase Behavior and Wall Formation in Zr(SO4)2/CTABr and TiOSO4/CTABr Mesophases. Chemistry of Materials, 11(10), 3002-3008. doi:10.1021/cm991082x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-3B0F-1
Abstract
The phase behavior of Zr(SO4)2/CTABr composite mesophases was investigated as a function of surfactant chain length, temperature, and salt concentration by XRD. It was shown that the initial step is a rapid formation of either a pure lamellar, hexagonal, or a mixed hexagonal/lamellar phase with a low degree of condensation (room temperature), depending on the chain length of the surfactant as well as on the ionic strength of the solution. The observed features may be qualitatively explained by expected variations in the packing parameter. TiOSO4/CTABr composite mesophases were shown to form in a similar manner as Zr(SO4)2/CTABr. A model accounting for changes in the inorganic framework with increasing degree of intraaggregate condensation was developed. Furthermore, using a tubular reactor setup connected to an in situ XRD cell it was shown that the mesophase formation occurred immediately (<300 ms) after mixing of the reagents, which is the fastest ever recorded composite mesophase formation.