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Effect of preparation of iron-infiltrated activated carbon catalysts on nitrogen oxide conversion at low temperature

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Schmidt,  W.
Research Group Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Busch, M., Schmidt, W., Migunov, V., Beckel, A., Notthoff, C., Kompch, A., et al. (2014). Effect of preparation of iron-infiltrated activated carbon catalysts on nitrogen oxide conversion at low temperature. Applied Catalysis B, 160-161, 641-650. doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2014.05.010.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-3BEC-F
Abstract
Nitrogen oxides are toxic and their concentration in human workspace should be reduced to a minimum level. Among the possible catalyst materials activated carbon based catalysts are a cheap and non-toxic alternative of high availability. In this paper we investigate two different methods for the preparation of iron-infiltrated activated carbon catalysts: chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and the incipient wetness method (IWM). The effects of the preparation method on the structure and catalytical performance are compared with the effects of infiltration load and co-deposition of silicon dioxide. The study elucidates profound differences in the nitrogen dioxide adsorption and catalytic nitrogen oxide decomposition, depending on the catalyst preparation technique. Samples prepared by chemical vapor infiltration exhibit well dispersed iron/iron oxide particles all over the sample cross section. Crystalline iron oxide is only detected in the samples prepared via the gas phase and not in samples prepared by IWM. The nitrogen dioxide adsorption is notably enhanced in samples with a large accessible micropore volume. All samples containing iron catalyze the conversion of nitrogen oxides into nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide, but especially the co-deposition of silica enhances the nitric oxide conversion into less harmful species. The iron/silica-co-deposited activated carbon catalyst prepared via incipient wetness method exhibits the best catalytical performance of all investigated catalysts at 425 K.