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Multidiagnostic analysis of silicate speciation in clear solutions/sols for zeolite synthesis

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Castro,  Maria
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Lim,  Ivy
Research Department Schüth, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Schmidt,  W.
Research Group Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Castro, M., Haouas, M., Taulelle, F., Lim, I., Breynaert, E., Brabants, G., et al. (2014). Multidiagnostic analysis of silicate speciation in clear solutions/sols for zeolite synthesis. Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 189, 158-162. doi:10.1016/j.micromeso.2013.08.027.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-52E1-B
Abstract
The formation of zeolites in presence of tetraalkylammonium cations from so-called clear solutions using silicon alkoxides is a highly complex process which challenges experimental chemistry. Most clear solutions are better described as clear sols as they contain nanosized silicate particles, which are formed during hydrolysis of the Si source before self-assembly into the zeolite framework. This process spans multiple time- and length-scales and only a combination of different analysis methods allows revelation of molecular level zeolite formation mechanisms. On the example of the early stages of the formation of zeolite beta from clear solutions/sols the different windows of observation of liquid-state 29Si and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and mass spectrometry (MS) are demonstrated. Each diagnostic means by itself needs to be carefully assessed for its window of temporal and spatial resolution which can be achieved by exploiting the overlapping information available from their combination.