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Generation of ultra-short hydrogen atom pulses by bunch-compression photolysis.

MPG-Autoren
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Kaufmann,  S.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Schwarzer,  D.
Research Group of Reaction Dynamics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Reichardt,  C.
Research Group of Reaction Dynamics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Wodtke,  A. M.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

2072883.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 446KB

Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)

2072883_Suppl.pdf
(Ergänzendes Material), 627KB

Zitation

Kaufmann, S., Schwarzer, D., Reichardt, C., Wodtke, A. M., & Bünermann, O. (2014). Generation of ultra-short hydrogen atom pulses by bunch-compression photolysis. Nature Communications, 5: 5373. doi:10.1038/ncomms6373.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-400F-5
Zusammenfassung
Ultra-short light pulses enable many time-resolved studies in chemistry, especially when used in pump-probe experiments. However, most chemical events are not initiated by light, but rather by collisions. Time-resolved collisional experiments require ultra-short pulses of atoms and molecules-sadly, methods for producing such pulses are so far unknown. Here we introduce bunch-compression photolysis, an approach to forming ultra-short and highly intense pulses of neutral atoms. We demonstrate H-atom pulses of 1.2±0.3ns duration, far shorter than any previously reported. Owing to its extraordinarily simple physical principles, we can accurately model the method-the model shows H-atom pulses as short as 110-ps are achievable. Importantly, due to the bunch-compression, large (mm(3)) photolysis volumes are possible, a key advantage for pulse intensity. This technique overcomes the most challenging barrier to a new class of experiments on time-resolved collisions involving atoms and molecules.