Deutsch
 
Benutzerhandbuch Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Sleep EEG effects of anti-gluco- and anti-mineralocorticoids in old-aged men: Pilot study

MPG-Autoren
/persons/resource/persons80541

Steiger,  Axel
Dept. Clinical Research, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons141838

Wiedemann,  Klaus
external;
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Demiralay, C., Agorastos, A., Steiger, A., & Wiedemann, K. (2014). Sleep EEG effects of anti-gluco- and anti-mineralocorticoids in old-aged men: Pilot study. PSYCHIATRY AND CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCES, 68(5), 383-387. doi:10.1111/pcn.12142.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-CF6A-7
Zusammenfassung
Aim Age-related sleep changes have been associated with altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity and impaired feedback inhibition at the glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptor level. To further investigate the specific role of this binary receptor system in the elderly, sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) effects of the MR antagonist spironolactone and GR antagonist mifepristone in old-aged men were compared in this pilot study. Methods Old-aged healthy men (n=6, 65-91 years) were treated on three occasions in a single-blinded design in random order with mifepristone, spironolactone and placebo, respectively, and nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded. Results Mifepristone led to increased wake time, decreased stage 2 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and prolonged REM sleep latency in the first half of the night, whereas spironolactone had no considerable effects on sleep EEG. Conclusion GR antagonism can potentiate age-related sleep pattern alterations and further support the role of impaired GR signaling in age-related changes in sleep architecture.