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Brain networks of perceptual decision-making: An fMRI ALE meta-analysis

MPS-Authors
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Forstmann,  Birte U.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Faculty of Social and Behavioural Science, Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherland;

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Neumann,  Jane
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany;

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Keuken_BrainNetworks.pdf
(Publisher version), 860KB

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Citation

Keuken, M. C., Müller-Axt, C., Langner, R., Eickhoff, S. B., Forstmann, B. U., & Neumann, J. (2014). Brain networks of perceptual decision-making: An fMRI ALE meta-analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8: 445. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00445.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-4D3D-6
Abstract
In the recent perceptual decision-making literature, a fronto-parietal network is typically reported to primarily represent the neural substrate of human perceptual decision-making. However, the view that only cortical areas are involved in perceptual decision-making has been challenged by several neurocomputational models which all argue that the basal ganglia play an essential role in perceptual decisions. To consolidate these different views, we conducted an Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on the existing neuroimaging literature. The results argue in favor of the involvement of a frontal-parietal network in general perceptual decision-making that is possibly complemented by the basal ganglia, and modulated in substantial parts by task difficulty. In contrast, expectation of reward, an important aspect of many decision-making processes, shows almost no overlap with the general perceptual decision-making network.