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Styrene oxide DNA adducts: in vitro reaction and sensitive detection of modified oligonucleotides using capillary zone electrophoresis interfaced to electrospray mass spectrometry

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Schrader,  Wolfgang
ISAS Institute of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, P.O. Box 101352, D-44013 Dortmund, Germany, DE ;
Service Department Schrader (MS), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schrader, W., & Linscheid, M. (1997). Styrene oxide DNA adducts: in vitro reaction and sensitive detection of modified oligonucleotides using capillary zone electrophoresis interfaced to electrospray mass spectrometry. Archives of Toxicology, 71(9), 588-595. doi:10.1007/s002040050431.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-58A9-E
Abstract
Styrene is one of the most important synthetic chemicals in the world and is subject to investigations concerning carcinogenicity and mutagenicity due to the active metabolite, styrene-7,8-oxide. This epoxide shows a tendency to react, among others, with DNA and DNA constituents. The in vitro reaction of styrene oxide with DNA was investigated by cleaving incubated calf thymus DNA with two different enzymes, namely Benzonase and alkaline phosphatase, to obtain oligonucleotides of the type n-nucleotide-(n−1)-phosphate with chain length from 2 to 8 bases. Alkylated and non-alkylated nucleotides were separated in groups according to their chain length using capillary zone electrophoresis and were detected with electrospray mass spectrometry. This improvement in sensitivity made it possible to obtain new information about the reaction of styrene oxide with DNA, especially to detect unknown reaction products. The results indicate that primarily purine bases were alkylated by styrene oxide before pyrimidine bases, which react with higher concentrations of styrene oxide. This means that in addition to the already reported adducts in DNA at the N7-, O6- and N2-position of guanine also adducts at the nucleophilic sites of adenine can be found using mass spectrometry. We anticipate for the future this procedure will allow us to investigate base sequence specific reactions as well as interactions from xenobiotics and cytostatic drugs, since reaction products would directly be detectable.