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Journal Article

Reaction Cycle of the Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

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Parey,  Kristian
Department of Molecular Membrane Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Warkentin,  Eberhard
Department of Molecular Membrane Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Ermler,  Ulrich
Department of Molecular Membrane Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Parey, K., Warkentin, E., Kroneck, P. M., & Ermler, U. (2010). Reaction Cycle of the Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus. Biochemistry, 49(41), 8912-8921.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-D718-4
Abstract
A vital process in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle is the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway in which sulfate (SO42-) is converted to hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dSir), its key enzyme, hosts a unique siroheme-[4Fe-4S] cofactor and catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite (SO32-) toH2S. To explore this reaction, we determined the X-ray structures of dSir from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus in complex with sulfite, sulfide (S2-), carbon monoxide (CO), cyanide (CN-), nitrite (NO2-), nitrate (NO3-), and phosphate (PO43-). Activity measurements indicated that dSir of A. fulgidus reduces, besides sulfite and nitrite, thiosulfate (S2O32-) and trithionate (S3O62-) and produces the latter two compounds besides sulfide. On this basis, a three-step mechanism was proposed, each step consisting of a two-electron transfer, a two-proton uptake, and a dehydration event. In comparison, the related active site structures of the assimilatory sulfite reductase (aSir)- and dSir-SO32- complexes reveal different conformations of Argα 170 and Lysα211 both interacting with the sulfite oxygens (its sulfur atom coordinates the siroheme iron), a sulfite rotation of ~60° relative to each other, and different access of solvent molecules to the sulfite oxygens from the active site cleft. Therefore, solely in dSir a further sulfite molecule can be placed in van der Waals contact with the siroheme-ligated sulfite or sulfur-oxygen intermediates necessary for forming thiosulfate and trithionate. Although reported for dSir from several sulfate-reducing bacteria, the in vivo relevance of their formation is questionable.