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Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation.

MPS-Authors
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Bartels,  N.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Krüger,  B. C.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Auerbach,  D. J.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Wodtke,  A. M.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Schäfer,  T.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bartels, N., Krüger, B. C., Auerbach, D. J., Wodtke, A. M., & Schäfer, T. (2014). Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 53(50), 13690-13694. doi:10.1002/anie.201407051.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-63A7-8
Abstract
The loss or gain of vibrational energy in collisions of an NO molecule with the surface of a gold single crystal proceeds by electron transfer. With the advent of new optical pumping and orientation methods, we can now control all molecular degrees of freedom important to this electron-transfer-mediated process, providing the most detailed look yet into the inner workings of an electron-transfer reaction and showing how to control its outcome. We find the probability of electron transfer increases with increasing translational and vibrational energy as well as with proper orientation of the reactant. However, as the vibrational energy increases, translational excitation becomes unimportant and proper orientation becomes less critical. One can understand the interplay of all three control parameters from simple model potentials.