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Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity

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Leaci,  Paola
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Prix,  Reinhard
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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1502.00914.pdf
(Preprint), 3MB

PhysRevD.91_102003.pdf
(Any fulltext), 2MB

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Citation

Leaci, P., & Prix, R. (2015). Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity. Physical Review D, 91: 102003. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.91.102003.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-C5A0-0
Abstract
We derive simple analytic expressions for the (coherent and semi-coherent) phase metrics of continuous-wave sources in low-eccentricity binary systems, both for the long-segment and short- segment regimes (compared to the orbital period). The resulting expressions correct and extend previous results found in the literature. We present results of extensive Monte-Carlo studies comparing metric mismatch predictions against the measured loss of detection statistic for binary parameter offsets. The agreement is generally found to be within ~ 10%-30%. As an application of the metric template expressions, we estimate the optimal achievable sensitivity of an Einstein@Home directed search for Scorpius X-1, under the assumption of sufficiently small spin wandering. We find that such a search, using data from the upcoming advanced detectors, would be able to beat the torque- balance level [1,2] up to a frequency of ~ 500 - 600 Hz, if orbital eccentricity is well-constrained, and up to a frequency of ~ 160 - 200 Hz for more conservative assumptions about the uncertainty on orbital eccentricity.