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Chemical disorder as an engineering tool for spin polarization in Mn3Ga-based Heusler systems

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Chadov,  S.
Stanislav Chadov, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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D'Souza,  S. W.
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Wollmann,  L.
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Kiss,  J.
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Fecher,  G. H.
Gerhard Fecher, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Felser,  C.
Claudia Felser, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Chadov, S., D'Souza, S. W., Wollmann, L., Kiss, J., Fecher, G. H., & Felser, C. (2015). Chemical disorder as an engineering tool for spin polarization in Mn3Ga-based Heusler systems. Physical Review B, 91(9): 094203, pp. 1-8. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094203.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-B61F-8
Abstract
Our study highlights spin-polarization mechanisms in metals by focusing on the mobilities of conducting electrons with different spins instead of their quantities. Here, we engineer electron mobility by applying chemical disorder induced by nonstoichiometric variations. As a practical example, we discuss the scheme that establishes such variations in tetragonal Mn3Ga Heusler material. We justify this approach using first-principles calculations of the spin-projected conductivity components based on the Kubo-Greenwood formalism. It follows that, in the majority of cases, even a small substitution of some other transition element instead of Mn may lead to a substantial increase in spin polarization along the tetragonal axis.