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Ischemia induces a translocation of the splicing factor tra2- beta 1 and changes alternative splicing patterns in the brain

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Mies,  Günter
Multimodal Imaging of Brain Metabolism, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

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Hossmann,  Konstantin-Alexander
Konstantin-Alexander Hossmann, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Daoud, R., Mies, G., Smialowska, A., Olah, L., Hossmann, K.-A., & Stamm, S. (2002). Ischemia induces a translocation of the splicing factor tra2- beta 1 and changes alternative splicing patterns in the brain. Journal of Neuroscience, 22(14), 5889-5899.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-D647-4
Abstract
Alternative splice-site selection is regulated by the relative concentration of individual members of the serine-arginine family of proteins and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Most of these proteins accumulate predominantly in the nucleus, and a subset of them shuttles continuously between nucleus and cytosol. We demonstrate that in primary neuronal cultures, a rise in intracellular calcium concentration induced by thapsigargin leads to a translocation of the splicing regulatory protein tra2-beta1 and a consequent change in splice-site selection. To investigate this phenomenon under physiological conditions, we used an ischemia model. Ischemia induced in the brain causes a cytoplasmic accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tra2-beta1. In addition, several of the proteins binding to tra2-beta1, such as src associated in mitosis 68 and serine/arginine-rich proteins, accumulate in the cytosol. Concomitant with this subcellular relocalization, we observed a change in alternative splice-site usage of the ICH-1 gene. The increased usage of its alternative exons is in agreement with previous studies demonstrating its repression by a high concentration of proteins with serine/arginine-rich domains. Our findings suggest that a change in the calcium concentration associated with ischemia is part of a signaling event, which changes pre-mRNA splicing pathways by causing relocalization of proteins that regulate splice-site selection.