Deutsch
 
Benutzerhandbuch Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Monitoring of implanted stem cell migration in vivo: A highly resolved in vivo magnetic resonance imaging investigation of experimental stroke in rat

MPG-Autoren
/persons/resource/persons147197

Hoehn,  Mathias
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147221

Küstermann,  Ekkehard
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147133

Blunk,  James
Konstantin-Alexander Hossmann, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147342

Wiedermann,  Dirk
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147318

Trapp,  Thorsten
Konstantin-Alexander Hossmann, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147335

Wecker,  Stefan
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147169

Föcking,  Melanie
Konstantin-Alexander Hossmann, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147292

Schwindt,  Wolfram
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons147141

Bührle,  Christian
In-vivo-NMR, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Hoehn, M., Küstermann, E., Blunk, J., Wiedermann, D., Trapp, T., Wecker, S., et al. (2002). Monitoring of implanted stem cell migration in vivo: A highly resolved in vivo magnetic resonance imaging investigation of experimental stroke in rat. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99(25), 16267-16272.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-D6ED-1
Zusammenfassung
Copyright 2002 by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, all rights reserved
In vivo monitoring of stem cells after grafting is essential for a better understanding of their migrational dynamics and differentiation processes and of their regeneration potential. Migration of endogenous or grafted stem cells and neurons has been described in vertebrate brain, both under normal conditions from the subventricular zone along the rostral migratory stream and under pathophysiological conditions, such as degeneration or focal cerebral ischemia. Those studies, however, relied on invasive analysis of brain sections in combination with appropriate staining techniques. Here, we demonstrate the observation of cell migration under in vivo conditions, allowing the monitoring of the cell dynamics within individual animals, and for a prolonged time. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, constitutively expressing the GFIP, were labeled by a lipofection procedure with a MRI contrast agent and implanted into rat brains. Focal cerebral ischemia had been induced 2 weeks before implantation of ES cells into the healthy, contralateral hemisphere. MRI at 78-mum isotropic spatial resolution permitted the observation of the implanted cells with high contrast against the host tissue, and was confirmed by GFP registration. During 3 weeks, cells migrated along the corpus callosum to the ventricular walls, and massively populated the borderzone of the damaged brain tissue on the hemisphere opposite to the implantation sites. Our results indicate that ES cells have high migrational dynamics, targeted to the cerebral lesion area. The imaging approach is ideally suited for the noninvasive observation of cell migration, engraftment, and morphological differentiation at high spatial and temporal resolution.