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Journal Article

High-speed real-time MRI of fast tongue movements in elite horn players.

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Frahm,  J.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Voit,  D.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Joseph,  A. A.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Iltis, P. W., Frahm, J., Voit, D., Joseph, A. A., Schoonderwaldt, E., & Altenmüller, E. (2015). High-speed real-time MRI of fast tongue movements in elite horn players. Quantitative Imaging in Medicine and Surgery, 5(3), 374-381. doi:10.3978/j.issn.2223-4292.2015.03.02.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-CE58-B
Abstract
This paper describes the use of high-speed real-time (RT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in quantifying very rapid motor function within the oropharyngeal cavity of six elite horn players. Based on simultaneous sound recordings, the efficacy of RT-MRI films at 30 and 100 frames per second (fps) was assessed for tongue movements associated with double tonguing performance. Serial images with a nominal temporal resolution of 10.0 and 33.3 ms were obtained by highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences (5 and 17 spokes, respectively) using complementary sets of spokes for successive acquisitions (extending over 9 and 5 frames, respectively). Reconstructions of high-speed images were obtained by temporally regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV) as previously described. A customized MATLAB toolkit was developed for the extraction of line profiles from MRI films to quantify temporal phenomena associated with task performance. The analyses reveal that for the present setting, which required the use of a temporal median filter to optimize image quality, acquisition rates of 30 fps are inadequate to accurately detect tongue movements during double tonguing, but that rates of 100 fps do allow for a precise quantification of movement. These data for the first time demonstrate the extreme performance of elite horn players. High-speed RT-MRI offers so far unavailable opportunities to study the oropharyngeal movements during brass playing with future potential for teaching and the treatment of patients suffering from dystonia.