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Journal Article

Genetics of rapid eye movement sleep in humans.

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Adamczyk,  M.
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Holsboer,  F.
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Friess,  E.
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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tp201585a.pdf
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Citation

Adamczyk, M., Ambrosius, U., Lietzenmaier, S., Wichniak, A., Holsboer, F., & Friess, E. (2015). Genetics of rapid eye movement sleep in humans. Translational psychiatry, 5: e598. doi:10.1038/tp.2015.85.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-0749-3
Abstract
The trait-like nature of electroencephalogram (EEG) is well established. Furthermore, EEG of wake and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep has been shown to be highly heritable. However, the genetic effects on REM sleep EEG microstructure are as yet unknown. REM sleep is of special interest since animal and human data suggest a connection between REM sleep abnormalities and the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here we report the results of a study in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins examining the heritability of REM sleep EEG. We studied the architecture, spectral composition and phasic parameters of REM sleep and identified genetic effects on whole investigated EEG frequency spectrum as well as phasic REM parameters (REM density, REM activity and organization of REMs in bursts). In addition, cluster analysis based on the morphology of the EEG frequency spectrum revealed that the similarity among MZ twins is close to intra-individual stability. The observed strong genetic effects on REM sleep characteristics establish REM sleep as an important source of endophenotypes for psychiatric and neurological diseases.