Deutsch
 
Benutzerhandbuch Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Imprinted Zac1 in neural stem cells.

MPG-Autoren
/persons/resource/persons141755

Daniel,  Guillaume
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons146001

Schmidt-Edelkraut,  Udo
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons80535

Spengler,  Dietmar
Dept. Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons80370

Hoffmann,  Anke
Dept. Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

300.pdf
(beliebiger Volltext), 2MB

Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Daniel, G., Schmidt-Edelkraut, U., Spengler, D., & Hoffmann, A. (2015). Imprinted Zac1 in neural stem cells. World journal of stem cells, 7(2), 300-14. doi:10.4252/wjsc.v7.i2.300.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-E2E4-7
Zusammenfassung
Neural stem cells (NSCs) and imprinted genes play an important role in brain development. On historical grounds, these two determinants have been largely studied independently of each other. Recent evidence suggests, however, that NSCs can reset select genomic imprints to prevent precocious depletion of the stem cell reservoir. Moreover, imprinted genes like the transcriptional regulator Zac1 can fine tune neuronal vs astroglial differentiation of NSCs. Zac1 binds in a sequence-specific manner to pro-neuronal and imprinted genes to confer transcriptional regulation and furthermore coregulates members of the p53-family in NSCs. At the genome scale, Zac1 is a central hub of an imprinted gene network comprising genes with an important role for NSC quiescence, proliferation and differentiation. Overall, transcriptional, epigenomic, and genomic mechanisms seem to coordinate the functional relationships of NSCs and imprinted genes from development to maturation, and possibly aging.