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A novel tool in laryngeal surgery: Preliminary results of the picosecond infrared laser

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Krötz,  Peter
Atomically Resolved Structural Dynamics Division, Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics, Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, External Organizations;
International Max Planck Research School for Ultrafast Imaging & Structural Dynamics (IMPRS-UFAST), Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Böttcher, A., Clauditz, T. S., Knecht, R., Kucher, S., Wöllmer, W., Wilczak, W., et al. (2013). A novel tool in laryngeal surgery: Preliminary results of the picosecond infrared laser. The Laryngoscope, 123(11), 2770-2775. doi:10.1002/lary.24124.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-1E21-6
Abstract
Objectives/Hypothesis: Conventional lasers ablate tissue through photothermal, photomechanical, and/or photoionizing effects, which may result in collateral tissue damage. The novel nonionizing picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) selectively energizes tissue water molecules using ultrafast pulses to drive ablation on timescales faster than energy transport to minimize collateral damage to adjacent cells. Study Design: Animal cadaver study. Methods: Cuts in porcine laryngeal epithelium, lamina propria, and cartilage were made using PIRL and carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. Lateral damage zones and cutting gaps were histologically compared. Results: The mean widths of epithelial (8.5 μm), subepithelial (10.9 μm), and cartilage damage zones (8.1 μm) were significantly lower for cuts made by PIRL compared with CO2 laser (p < 0.001). Mean cutting gaps in vocal fold (174.7 μm) and epiglottic cartilage (56.3 μm) were significantly narrower for cuts made by PIRL compared with CO2 laser (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). Conclusion: PIRL ablation demonstrates superiority over CO2 laser in cutting precision with less collateral tissue damage.