English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The pirouette effect in turbulent flows

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons173713

Xu,  Haitao
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons173623

Pumir,  Alain       
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons173472

Bodenschatz,  Eberhard       
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Xu, H., Pumir, A., & Bodenschatz, E. (2011). The pirouette effect in turbulent flows. Nature Physics, 7, 709-712. doi:10.1038/NPHYS2010.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-1175-C
Abstract
The disorganized fluctuations of turbulence are crucial in the transport of particles or chemicals(1,2) and could play a decisive role in the formation of rain in clouds(3), the accretion process in protoplanetary disks(4), and how animals find their mates or prey(5,6). These and other examples(7) suggest a yet-to-be-determined unifying structure of turbulent flows(8,9). Here, we unveil an important ingredient of turbulence by taking the perspective of an observer who perceives its world with respect to three distant neighbours all swept by the flow. The time evolution of the observer's world can be decomposed into rotation and stretching. We show that, in this Lagrangian frame, the axis of rotation aligns with the initially strongest stretching direction, and that the dynamics can be understood by the conservation of angular momentum. This 'pirouette effect' thus appears as an important structural component of turbulence, and elucidates the mechanism for small-scale generation in turbulence.