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Conference Paper

Measurement of Particle Accelerations with the Laser Doppler Technique

MPS-Authors
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Nobach,  Holger
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Zimmermann,  Robert
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Bodenschatz,  Eberhard
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Nobach, H., Kinzel, M., Zimmermann, R., Tropea, C., & Bodenschatz, E. (2009). Measurement of Particle Accelerations with the Laser Doppler Technique. In Second International Conference on Turbulence and Interaction (pp. 1-8).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-12F9-D
Abstract
An extension of the laser Doppler technique for measuring particle acceleration is presented. The basic principles of the technique follow closely those introduced in [11], although numerous improvements have been implemented in the signal processing for increasing the reliability of individual estimates of particle acceleration. The main contribution of this study is to identify and quantify the errors due to optical fringe divergence in the detection volume of the present laser Doppler system, to introduce an appropriate experiment involving a falling wire and to compare the acceleration measurements of the laser Doppler system to the results of a particle tracking system with high-speed cameras in a highly turbulent flow. Noteworthy is the fact that all measurements were performed with a commercial off-the-shelf laser Doppler system.