English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Morphological Clues to Wet Granular Pile Stability

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons173640

Scheel,  M.
Group Geometry of Fluid Interfaces, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121851

Seemann,  R.
Group Geometry of Fluid Interfaces, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121177

Brinkmann,  M.
Group Theory of wet random assemblies, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121410

Herminghaus,  S.
Group Granular matter and irreversibility, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Scheel, M., Seemann, R., Brinkmann, M., Di Michiel, M., Sheppard, A., Breidenbach, B., et al. (2008). Morphological Clues to Wet Granular Pile Stability. Nature Materials, 7, 189-193. doi:10.1038/nmat2117.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-13AD-2
Abstract
When a granular material such as sand is mixed with a certain amount of liquid, the surface tension of the latter bestows considerable stiffness to the material, which enables, for example, sand castles to be sculpted. The geometry of the liquid interface within the granular pile is of extraordinary complexity and strongly varies with the liquid content. Surprisingly, the mechanical properties of the pile are largely independent of the amount of liquid over a wide range. We resolve this puzzle with the help of X-ray microtomography, showing that the remarkable insensitivity of the mechanical properties to the liquid content is due to the particular organization of the liquid in the pile into open structures. For spherical grains, a simple geometric rule is established, which relates the macroscopic properties to the internal liquid morphologies. We present evidence that this concept is also valid for systems with non-spherical grains. Hence, our results provide new insight towards understanding the complex physics of a large variety of wet granular systems including land slides, as well as mixing and agglomeration problems.