English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Chemotaxis in microfluidic devices – a study of flow effects

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons21364

Beta,  Carsten
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons173514

Froehlich,  Toni
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons173472

Bodenschatz,  Eberhard       
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Beta, C., Froehlich, T., Boedeker, H., & Bodenschatz, E. (2008). Chemotaxis in microfluidic devices – a study of flow effects. Lab on A Chip, 8, 1087-1096. doi:10.1039/b801331d.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-13C7-6
Abstract
The use of microfluidic devices has become increasingly popular in the study of chemotaxis due to the exceptional control of flow properties and concentration profiles on the length scale of individual cells. In these applications, it is often neglected that cells, attached to the inner surfaces of the microfluidic chamber, are three-dimensional objects that perturb and distort the flow field in their vicinity. Depending on the interplay of flow speed and geometry with the diffusive time scale of the chemoattractant in the flow, the concentration distribution across the cell membrane may differ strongly from the optimal gradient in a perfectly smooth channel. We analyze the underlying physics in a two-dimensional approximation and perform systematic numerical finite element simulations to characterize the three-dimensional case and to identify optimal flow conditions.