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Conference Paper

The PRISM software framework and the OASIS coupler

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Budich,  Reinhard G.
The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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PRISM_OASIS_ACCESS.pdf
(Publisher version), 50KB

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Citation

Valcke, S., Budich, R. G., Carter, M., Guilyardi, E., Foujols, M.-A., Lautenschlager, M., et al. (2006). The PRISM software framework and the OASIS coupler. In A. Hollis, & A. Karito (Eds.), Proceedings of the eighteenth annual BMRC Modelling Workshop 'The Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) - challenges and opportunities'.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-52D2-5
Abstract
The increasing complexity of Earth system models (ESMs) and computing facilities puts a heavy technical burden on the research teams active in climate modelling. PRISM provides the Earth System Modelling community with a forum to promote sharing of development, maintenance and support of standards and software tools used to assemble, run, and analyse ESMs based on state-of-the-art component models (ocean, atmosphere, land surface, etc..) developed in the different climate research centres in Europe and elsewhere. PRISM is organised as a distributed network of experts who contribute to five "PRISM Areas of Expertise" (PAE): 1) Code coupling and I/O, 2) Integration and modelling environments, 3) Data processing, visualisation and management, 4) Meta-data, and 5) Computing. For example, the PAE “Code coupling and I/O” develops and supports the OASIS coupler, a software allowing synchronized exchanges of coupling information between numerical codes representing different components of the climate system. OASIS successfully demonstrates shared software, capitalising about 25 person-years of mutual developments and fulfilling the coupling needs of about 15 climate research groups around the world.