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Evidence for a role of the rare p.A152T variant in MAPT in increasing the risk for FTD-spectrum and Alzheimers diseases

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Mandelkow,  E. M.
Neuronal Cytoskeleton and Alzheimer's Disease, Cooperations, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Mandelkow,  E.
Neuronal Cytoskeleton and Alzheimer's Disease, Cooperations, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Coppola, G., Chinnathambi, S., Lee, J. J., Dombroski, B. A., Baker, M. C., Soto-Ortolaza, A. I., et al. (2012). Evidence for a role of the rare p.A152T variant in MAPT in increasing the risk for FTD-spectrum and Alzheimers diseases. Human Molecular Genetics, 21(15), 3500-3512. doi:Doi 10.1093/Hmg/Dds161.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-62C2-A
Abstract
Tau p.A152T significantly increases the risk for both FTD-s (n 2139, OR 3.0, CI: 1.65.6, P 0.0005) and Alzheimers disease (AD) (n 3345, OR 2.3, CI: 1.34.2, P 0.004) compared with 9047 controls. Functionally, p.A152T (i) decreases the binding of tau to microtubules and therefore promotes microtubule assembly less efficiently; and (ii) reduces the tendency to form abnormal fibers. However, there is a pronounced increase in the formation of tau oligomers. Importantly, these findings suggest that other regions of the tau protein may be crucial in regulating normal function, as the p.A152 residue is distal to the domains considered responsible for microtubule interactions or aggregation. These data provide both the first genetic evidence and functional studies supporting the role of MAPT p.A152T as a rare risk factor for both FTD-s and AD and the concept that rare variants can increase the risk for relatively common, complex neurodegenerative diseases, but since no clear significance threshold for rare genetic variation has been established, some caution is warranted until the findings are further replicated.