Deutsch
 
Benutzerhandbuch Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Variants of the protein PRDM9 differentially regulate a set of human meiotic recombination hotspots highly active in African populations

MPG-Autoren
Es sind keine MPG-Autoren in der Publikation vorhanden
Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Berg, I. L., Neumann, R., Sarbajna, S., Odenthal-Hesse, L., Butler, N. J., & Jeffreys, a. A. J. (2011). Variants of the protein PRDM9 differentially regulate a set of human meiotic recombination hotspots highly active in African populations. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(30), 12378-12383. doi:10.1073/pnas.1109531108.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-63D2-D
Zusammenfassung
PRDM9 is a major specifier of human meiotic recombination hotspots, probably via binding of its zinc-finger repeat array to a DNA sequence motif associated with hotspots. However, our viewof PRDM9 regulation, in terms ofmotifs defined and hotspots studied, has a strong bias toward the PRDM9 A variant particularly common in Europeans. We show that population diversity can reveal a second class of hotspots specifically activated by PRDM9 variants common in Africans but rare in Europeans. These Africanenhanced hotspots nevertheless share very similar propertieswith their counterparts activated by the A variant. The specificity of hotspot activation is such that individuals with differing PRDM9 genotypes, evenwithin the same population, can use substantially if not completely different sets of hotspots. Each African-enhanced hotspot is activated by a distinct spectrum of PRDM9 variants, despite the fact that all are predicted to bind the same sequence motif. This differential activation points to complex interactions between the zinc-finger array and hotspots and identifies features of the array that might be important in controlling hotspot activity.