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Polar Nature of Biomimetic Fluorapatite/Gelatin Composites: A Comparison of Bipolar Objects and the Polar State of Natural Tissue

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Busch,  Susanne
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Kniep,  Rüdiger
Rüdiger Kniep, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Burgener, M., Putzeys, T., Gashti, M. P., Busch, S., Aboulfadl, H., Wübbenhorst, M., et al. (2015). Polar Nature of Biomimetic Fluorapatite/Gelatin Composites: A Comparison of Bipolar Objects and the Polar State of Natural Tissue. Biomacromolecules, 16(9), 2814-2819. doi:10.1021/acs.biomac.5b00770.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-96DF-1
Abstract
The correspondence of the state of alignment of macromolecules in biomimetic materials and natural tissues is demonstrated by investigating a mechanism of electrical polarity formation: An in vitro grown biomimetic FAp/gelatin composite is investigated for its polar properties by second harmonic (SHGM) and scanning pyroelectric microscopy (SPEM). Hexagonal prismatic seed crystals formed in gelatin gels represent a monodomain polar state, due to aligned mineralized gelatin molecules. Later growth stages, showing dumbbell morphologies, develop into a bipolar state because of surface recognition by gelatin functionality: A reversal of the polar alignment of macromolecules, thus, takes place close to that basal plane of the seed. In natural hard tissues (teeth and bone investigated by SPEM) and the biomimetic FAp/gelatin composite, we find a surprising analogy in view of growth-induced states of polarity: The development of polarity in vivo and in vitro can be explained by a Markov-type mechanism of molecular recognition during the attachment of macromolecules.