English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Shaping and patterning gold nanoparticles via micelle templated photochemistry

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons185677

Kundrat,  F.
Fässler, Reinhard / Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons78521

Polleux,  J.
Fässler, Reinhard / Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kundrat, F., Baffou, G., & Polleux, J. (2015). Shaping and patterning gold nanoparticles via micelle templated photochemistry. NANOSCALE, 7(38), 15814-15821. doi:10.1039/c5nr04751j.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-E12A-4
Abstract
Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as reactive and light-responsive templates, which enable to grow gold deformed nanoparticles (potatoids) and nanorings. Optical characterization reveals that arrays of individual potatoids and rings feature a localized plasmon resonance around 600 and 800 nm, respectively, enhanced photothermal properties and high temperature sustainability, making them ideal platforms for future developments in nanochemistry and biomolecular manipulation controlled by near-infrared-induced heat.