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Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion

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Dodekatos,  Georgios
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Schünemann,  Stephan
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Tüysüz,  Harun
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Dodekatos, G., Schünemann, S., & Tüysüz, H. (2016). Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion. In Topics in Current Chemistry (pp. 215-252). Berlin: Springer-Verlag. doi:10.1007/128_2015_642.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-035A-A
Abstract
The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.