English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Altered carbon turnover processes and microbiomes in soils under long-term extremely high CO2 exposure

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons128379

Nowak,  Martin
Molecular Biogeochemistry Group, Dr. G. Gleixner, Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS International Max Planck Research School for Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons62589

Trumbore,  Susan E.
Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons62384

Gleixner,  Gerd
Molecular Biogeochemistry Group, Dr. G. Gleixner, Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Beulig, F., Urich, T., Nowak, M., Trumbore, S. E., Gleixner, G., Gilfillan, G., et al. (2016). Altered carbon turnover processes and microbiomes in soils under long-term extremely high CO2 exposure. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 1(2): 15025. doi:10.1038/nmicrobiol.2015.25.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-1E14-D
Abstract
There is only limited understanding of the impact of high p(CO2) on soil biomes. We have studied a floodplain wetland where long-term emanations of temperate volcanic CO2 (mofettes) are associated with accumulation of carbon from the Earth’s mantle. With an integrated approach using isotope geochemistry, soil activity measurements and multi-omics analyses, we demonstrate that high (nearly pure) CO2 concentrations have strongly affected pathways of carbon production and decomposition and therefore carbon turnover. In particular, a promotion of dark CO2 fixation significantly increased the input of geogenic carbon in the mofette when compared to a reference wetland soil exposed to normal levels of CO2. Radiocarbon analysis revealed that high quantities of mofette soil carbon originated from the assimilation of geogenic CO2 (up to 67%) via plant primary production and subsurface CO2 fixation. However, the preservation and accumulation of almost undegraded organic material appeared to be facilitated by the permanent exclusion of meso- to macroscopic eukaryotes and associated physical and/or ecological traits rather than an impaired biochemical potential for soil organic matter decomposition. Our study shows how CO2-induced changes in diversity and functions of the soil community can foster an unusual biogeochemical profile.