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Comparison of ozone deposition measured with the dynamic chamber and the eddy covariance method

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Plake,  D.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Stella,  P.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101145

Moravek,  A.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101129

Mayer,  J.-C.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101320

Trebs,  I.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Plake, D., Stella, P., Moravek, A., Mayer, J.-C., Ammann, C., Held, A., et al. (2015). Comparison of ozone deposition measured with the dynamic chamber and the eddy covariance method. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 206, 97-112. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2015.02.014.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-2883-8
Abstract
Nowadays, eddy covariance is the state-of-the-art method to quantify turbulent exchange fluxes in the surface boundary layer. In the absence of instruments suitable for high-frequency measurements, fluxes can also be determined using e.g., chamber techniques. However, up to date fluxes of depositing compounds were rarely determined using chamber techniques, mainly due to a modification of the aerodynamic conditions for the trace gas transport within the chamber. In this study, we present ozone (O-3) deposition fluxes measured by the dynamic chamber technique and validate them against the eddy covariance (EC) method for a natural grassland site in Germany. The chamber system presented in Pape et al. (2009) was used and optimized to (i) reduce the likelihood of non-stationarities, (ii) yield 30 min averages of flux measurements, and (iii) supply simultaneous profile measurements. The raw O-3 fluxes of the dynamic chamber were corrected for gas-phase chemistry in the chamber volume and for the modification of the aerodynamic and boundary layer resistances. Simultaneously measured carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes by both methods compared well during daytime documenting an equal vegetation activity inside and outside the chambers. The final corrected O-3 deposition fluxes of both methods deviated on average by only 11% during daytime. The findings demonstrate the capability of the dynamic chamber method to capture representative O-3 deposition fluxes for grassland ecosystems, even when the canopy height is similar to the chamber height. The canopy resistance to O-3 was assessed by both methods and showed a characteristic diurnal cycle with minimum hourly median values of 180 s m(-1) (chambers) and 150s m(-1) (EC) before noon. During nighttime the fluxes and resistances showed a higher uncertainty for both methods due to frequent low wind associated with non-stationary conditions at the experimental site. Canopy resistances for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) deposition were determined analogously with the chambers and were on average 86% higher than for O-3. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.