English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Time-resolved single dopant charge dynamics in silicon

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons140803

Burgess,  Jacob A. J.
Dynamics of Nanoelectronic Systems, Independent Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research;

/persons/resource/persons133858

Loth,  Sebastian
Dynamics of Nanoelectronic Systems, Independent Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research;

External Ressource
Fulltext (public)

1512.01101.pdf
(Preprint), 2MB

ncomms13258.pdf
(Publisher version), 691KB

Supplementary Material (public)

ncomms13258-s1.pdf
(Supplementary material), 576KB

Citation

Rashidi, M., Burgess, J. A. J., Taucer, M., Achal, R., Pitters, J. L., Loth, S., et al. (2016). Time-resolved single dopant charge dynamics in silicon. Nature Communications, 7: 13258. doi:10.1038/ncomms13258.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-22C7-2
Abstract
As the ultimate miniaturization of semiconductor devices approaches, it is imperative that the effects of single dopants be clarified. Beyond providing insight into functions and limitations of conventional devices, such information enables identification of new device concepts. Investigating single dopants requires sub-nanometre spatial resolution, making scanning tunnelling microscopy an ideal tool. However, dopant dynamics involve processes occurring at nanosecond timescales, posing a significant challenge to experiment. Here we use time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy to probe and study transport through a dangling bond on silicon before the system relaxes or adjusts to accommodate an applied electric field. Atomically resolved, electronic pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy permits unprecedented, quantitative measurement of time-resolved single dopant ionization dynamics. Tunnelling through the surface dangling bond makes measurement of a signal that would otherwise be too weak to detect feasible. Distinct ionization and neutralization rates of a single dopant are measured and the physical process controlling those are identified.