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Journal Article

Plasmodium apicoplast Gln-tRNAGln biosynthesis utilizes a unique GatAB amidotransferase essential for erythrocytic stage parasites

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Fritz-Wolf,  Karin
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mailu, B. M., Li, L., Arthur, J., Nelson, T. M., Ramasamy, G., Fritz-Wolf, K., et al. (2015). Plasmodium apicoplast Gln-tRNAGln biosynthesis utilizes a unique GatAB amidotransferase essential for erythrocytic stage parasites. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 290(49), 29629-29641. doi:10.1074/jbc.M115.655100.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-2984-D
Abstract
The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast indirect aminoacylation pathway utilizes a non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to synthesize Glu-tRNA(Gln) and a glutaminyl-tRNA amidotransferase to convert Glu-tRNA(Gln) to Gln-tRNA(Gln). Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans possess a unique heterodimeric glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase consisting of GatA and GatB subunits (GatAB). We localized the P. falciparum GatA and GatB subunits to the apicoplast in blood stage parasites and demonstrated that recombinant GatAB converts Glu-tRNA(Gln) to Gln-tRNA(Gln) in vitro. We demonstrate that the apicoplast GatAB-catalyzed reaction is essential to the parasite blood stages because we could not delete the Plasmodium berghei gene encoding GatA in blood stage parasites in vivo. A phylogenetic analysis placed the split between Plasmodium GatB, archaeal GatE, and bacterial GatB prior to the phylogenetic divide between bacteria and archaea. Moreover, Plasmodium GatA also appears to have emerged prior to the bacterial-archaeal phylogenetic divide. Thus, although GatAB is found in Plasmodium, it emerged prior to the phylogenetic separation of archaea and bacteria.