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Mutations in TRAF3IP1/IFT54 reveal a new role for IFT proteins in microtubule stabilization

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Weber,  Kristina
Lorentzen, Esben / Intraflagellar Transport, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Lorentzen,  Esben
Lorentzen, Esben / Intraflagellar Transport, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bizet, A. A., Becker-Heck, A., Ryan, R., Weber, K., Filhol, E., Krug, P., et al. (2015). Mutations in TRAF3IP1/IFT54 reveal a new role for IFT proteins in microtubule stabilization. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 6: 8666. doi:10.1038/ncomms9666.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-331E-6
Abstract
Ciliopathies are a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defects in primary cilia. Here we identified mutations in TRAF3IP1 (TNF Receptor-Associated Factor Interacting Protein 1) in eight patients from five families with nephronophthisis (NPH) and retinal degeneration, two of the most common manifestations of ciliopathies. TRAF3IP1 encodes IFT54, a subunit of the IFT-B complex required for ciliogenesis. The identified mutations result in mild ciliary defects in patients but also reveal an unexpected role of IFT54 as a negative regulator of microtubule stability via MAP4 (microtubule-associated protein 4). Microtubule defects are associated with altered epithelialization/polarity in renal cells and with pronephric cysts and microphthalmia in zebrafish embryos. Our findings highlight the regulation of cytoplasmic microtubule dynamics as a role of the IFT54 protein beyond the cilium, contributing to the development of NPH-related ciliopathies.