English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Cerebral correlates of emotional and action appraisals during visual processing of emotional scenes depending on spatial frequency: A pilot study

MPS-Authors
There are no MPG-Authors in the publication available
External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Campagne_2016.PDF
(Publisher version), 6MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Campagne, A., Fradcourt, B., Pichat, C., Baciu, M., Kauffmann, L., & Peyrin, C. (2016). Cerebral correlates of emotional and action appraisals during visual processing of emotional scenes depending on spatial frequency: A pilot study. PLoS One, 11(1): e0144393. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0144393.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-601F-E
Abstract
Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task’s demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal emotional experiences. It also illustrates flexible use of the spatial frequencies contained in scenes depending on their emotional valence and on task demands.