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Temporal dynamics of contingency extraction from tonal and verbal auditory sequences

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Schwartze,  Michael
School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom;
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Kotz,  Sonja A.
School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom;
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bendixen, A., Schwartze, M., & Kotz, S. A. (2015). Temporal dynamics of contingency extraction from tonal and verbal auditory sequences. Brain and Language, 148, 64-73. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2014.11.009.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-7117-7
Abstract
Consecutive sound events are often to some degree predictive of each other. Here we investigated the brain’s capacity to detect contingencies between consecutive sounds by means of electroencephalography (EEG) during passive listening. Contingencies were embedded either within tonal or verbal stimuli. Contingency extraction was measured indirectly via the elicitation of the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the event-related potential (ERP) by contingency violations. MMN results indicate that structurally identical forms of predictability can be extracted from both tonal and verbal stimuli. We also found similar generators to underlie the processing of contingency violations across stimulus types, as well as similar performance in an active-listening follow-up test. However, the process of passive contingency extraction was considerably slower (twice as many rule exemplars were needed) for verbal than for tonal stimuli These results suggest caution in transferring findings on complex predictive regularity processing obtained with tonal stimuli directly to the speech domain.