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Mutations in the relay loop region result in dominant-negative inhibition of myosin II function in Dictyostelium

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Tsiavaliaris,  Georgios
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Fujita-Becker,  Setsuko
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Batra,  Renu
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Manstein,  Dietmar J.
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Tsiavaliaris, G., Fujita-Becker, S., Batra, R., Levitsky, D. I., Kull, F. J., Geeves, M. A., et al. (2002). Mutations in the relay loop region result in dominant-negative inhibition of myosin II function in Dictyostelium. EMBO Reports, 3(11), 1099-1105. doi:10.1093/embo-reports/kvf214.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-7C31-A
Abstract
Dominant-negative inhibition is a powerful genetic tool for the characterization of gene function in vivo, based on the specific impairment of a gene product by the coexpression of a mutant version of the same gene product. We describe the detailed characterization of two myosin constructs containing either point mutations F487A or F506G in the relay region. Dictyostelium cells transformed with F487A or F506G myosin are unable to undergo processes that require myosin II function, including fruiting-body formation, normal cytokinesis and growth in suspension. Our results show that the dominant-negative inhibition of myosin function is caused by disruption of the communication between active site and lever arm, which blocks motor activity completely, and perturbation of the communication between active site and actin-binding site, leading to an ∼100-fold increase in the mutants' affinity for actin in the presence of ATP.