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Evidence of Extrapancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man

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Albrechtsen,  Nicolai J. Wewer
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Meissner,  Felix
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;
Meissner, Felix / Experimental Systems Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Mann,  Matthias
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lund, A., Bagger, J. I., Albrechtsen, N. J. W., Christensen, M., Grondahl, M., Hartmann, B., et al. (2016). Evidence of Extrapancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man. DIABETES, 65(3), 585-597. doi:10.2337/db15-1541.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-1A8D-1
Abstract
Glucagon is believed to be a pancreas-specific hormone, and hyperglucagonemia has been shown to contribute significantly to the hyperglycemic state of patients with diabetes. This hyperglucagonemia has been thought to arise from -cell insensitivity to suppressive effects of glucose and insulin combined with reduced insulin secretion. We hypothesized that postabsorptive hyperglucagonemia represents a gut-dependent phenomenon and subjected 10 totally pancreatectomized patients and 10 healthy control subjects to a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion. We applied novel analytical methods of plasma glucagon (sandwich ELISA and mass spectrometry-based proteomics) and show that 29-amino acid glucagon circulates in patients without a pancreas and that glucose stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract elicits significant hyperglucagonemia in these patients. These findings emphasize the existence of extrapancreatic glucagon (perhaps originating from the gut) in man and suggest that it may play a role in diabetes secondary to total pancreatectomy.