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Journal Article

Effect of pH and electrolyte concentration on rising air bubbles in β-lactoglobulin solutions

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Ulaganathan,  V.
Reinhard Miller, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Gochev,  G.
Reinhard Miller, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Miller,  R.
Reinhard Miller, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ulaganathan, V., Gochev, G., Gehin-Delval, C., Leser, M., Gunes, D., & Miller, R. (2016). Effect of pH and electrolyte concentration on rising air bubbles in β-lactoglobulin solutions. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 505, 165-170. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2016.03.059.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-33D1-1
Abstract
The local velocity profile (LVP) of a rising bubble can serve as a fingerprint for the dynamic behavior of the adsorption/desorption processes going on at a solution/air interface. The LVP of bubbles in β-lactoglobulin (BLG) solutions proves to be extremely sensitive for the adsorption of BLG at low bulk concentrations. In addition, it can show the impact of pH and ionic strength on the dynamic surface properties of BLG at the solution/air interface. It is observed that the time for establishing an immobile rigid surface layer at the rising bubble surface becomes shorter with increasing pH from 3 to 7. A peculiar behavior is observed at the isoelectric point (IEP) where the LVPs show irregularities. Under dynamic conditions BLG does not exhibit highest surface active at the IEP within the range of BLG concentrations as measured by the rising bubble technique.