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Functional imaging at 14.1T using high-resolution pass band bSSFP

MPS-Authors
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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Ehses,  P
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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He,  Y
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Merkle,  H
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Yu,  X
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Scheffler, K., Ehses, P., He, Y., Merkle, H., & Yu, X. (2015). Functional imaging at 14.1T using high-resolution pass band bSSFP. Poster presented at 23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2015), Toronto, Canada.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-45DD-3
Abstract
Sub-millimeter fMRI at very high fields with EPI is challenging due to the rapid signal decay and B0-related distortions. Balanced SSFP offers the possibility of high-resolution (100 um) acquisitions without spatial distortions and significantly higher temporal resolution compared to FLASH. Observed signal changes largely depend on T2 rather than T2* indicating a higher spatial selectivity compared to gradient echo-based methods.