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Identify the “single unit” of neurovascular coupling by single-vessel fMRI and optogenetics

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons192832

Wang,  M
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192829

He,  Y
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192855

Tang,  Y
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84805

Merkle,  H
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons133486

Yu,  X
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wang, M., He, Y., Tang, Y., Merkle, H., & Yu, X. (2015). Identify the “single unit” of neurovascular coupling by single-vessel fMRI and optogenetics. Poster presented at 23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2015), Toronto, Canada.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-45E5-F
Abstract
It has been demonstrated that the hemodynamic signal from individual venules can be detected directly with fMRI. Here, the hemodynamic signal from BOLD and CBV fMRI was measured at high temporal(100ms) and spatial resolution(150x150µm) in layer 4/5 of the rat forepaw S1with fast gradient-echo MRI. Distinctly different voxels were activated in BOLD vs CBV fMRI. In contrast to the BOLD activated voxels primarily located at the penetrating venules, CBV activated voxels were primarily located at penetrating arterioles. This result makes it possible to directly image the CBV and BOLD response at the single-vessel level to understand neurovascular coupling.