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Sensing the high magnetic field: Fusion of otoliths in zebrafish larvae entails a hint

MPS-Authors
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Pais Roldán,  P
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Merkle,  H
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schulz,  H
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Yu,  X
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pais Roldán, P., Singh, A., Merkle, H., Schulz, H., & Yu, X. (2015). Sensing the high magnetic field: Fusion of otoliths in zebrafish larvae entails a hint. In 23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2015).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-45F9-3
Abstract
Here we described the impact of the high magnetic field (MF) on zebrafish larvae aiming to identify potential biological MR sensors. 14T-MF exposures longer than 2 hours in zebrafish larvae led to fusion of 2 otoliths (CaCO3 crystals in the inner ear responsible for balance and hearing) and a subsequent aberrant balance behavior, a phenotype already described in genetic mutants. Identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this MF-induced otolith-fusion may be tackled with a zebrafish mutagenesis approach and might contribute in an efficient way to search for MR sensors in biological models.