English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Meeting Abstract

Looking at me? Influence of facing orientation of avatars and objects on distance estimation

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons192755

Foster,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192892

Kurek,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192903

Horeis,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192938

Bäuerle,  MJ
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84081

Meilinger,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Foster, C., Takahashi, K., Kurek, S., Horeis, C., Bäuerle, M., de la Rosa, S., et al. (2015). Looking at me? Influence of facing orientation of avatars and objects on distance estimation. In C. Bermeitinger, A. Mojzisch, & W. Greve (Eds.), TeaP 2015: Abstracts of the 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists (pp. 82). Lengerich, Germany: Pabst.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-473C-0
Abstract
Humans naturally keep a larger distance to the front of other people than to their back. Within three experiments we showed that such a front-back asymmetry is present already in perceived distances, and that it extends to objects as well as to human characters. Participants watched photorealistic virtual characters (avatars) and moving or static virtual objects (i.e., cameras) through a head mounted display. These were presented at different distances and were either facing the participants or facing away from them. Participants then estimated the perceived distance to cameras and avatars by moving a virtual object to this place. Both cameras and avatars facing participants resulted in shorter estimated distances than cameras and avatars facing away. This asymmetry was independent of the presented distance. Together with similar findings from similar experiments with virtual cones these results point towards a fundamental perceptual effect of object orientation. This orientation asymmetry effect does not depend on movement or object form and might indicate a basic form of social processing.