English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Meeting Abstract

Learning anticipatory eye-movements for control

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  LL
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84111

Nieuwenhuizen,  FM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192907

Walter,  J
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Chuang, L., Nieuwenhuizen, F., Walter, J., & Bülthoff, H. (2015). Learning anticipatory eye-movements for control. In C. Bermeitinger, A. Mojzisch, & W. Greve (Eds.), TeaP 2015: Abstracts of the 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists (pp. 58). Lengerich, Germany: Pabst.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-474A-0
Abstract
Anticipatory eye-movements (or look-ahead fixations) are often observed in complex closed-loop control tasks, such as steering a vehicle on a non-straight path (Land & Lee, 1994). This eye-movement behavior allows the observer to switch between different visual cues that are relevant for minimizing present and future control errors (Wilkie, Wann, & Allison, 2008). Here, we asked: Are anticipatory eye-movements generic or are they acquired according to the learning environment? We trained and tested 27 participants on a control system, which simulated the simplified dynamics of a rotorcraft. Participants had to translate laterally along a specified path while maintaining a fixed altitude. Ground and vertical landmarks provided respective visual cues. Training took place under one of three possible field-of-view conditions (height x width: 60° x 60°; 60° x 180°; 125° x 180°), while testing took place in an unrestricted field-of-view environment (125° x 230°). We found that restricting the field-of-view during training significantly decreases the number of anticipatory eye-movements during testing. This effect can be largely attributed to the size of the horizontal field-of-view. Our finding suggests that anticipatory eye-movements for closed-loop control are shaped by the conditions of the training environment.