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Cell Types in the Cerebral Cortex: An Overview from the Rat Vibrissal Cortex

MPS-Authors
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Egger,  R
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Former Research Group Computational Neuroanatomy, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Oberlaender,  M
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Former Research Group Computational Neuroanatomy, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Egger, R., & Oberlaender, M. (2015). Cell Types in the Cerebral Cortex: An Overview from the Rat Vibrissal Cortex. In A. Toga (Ed.), Brain Mapping: An Encyclopedic Reference (pp. 59-64). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Academic Press.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-47BD-C
Abstract
In the cerebral cortex, individual neurons have been assigned to cell types based on different gene expression patterns, biophysical and physiological properties, and morphological features of somata, dendrites, and axons. The goal of grouping neurons into cell types is to understand common principles in development and function of the cerebral cortex at the cellular level.
The somatodendritic cell-type classification presented here demonstrates how synaptic innervation, sensory-evoked functional responses, and axonal output pathways can be correlated at the levels of single neurons and cell types and how they relate to cell type-specific computations during different behavioral states of the animal.
This definition of cell types lays the anatomical foundation for articles describing detailed brain mapping approaches of excitatory cortical pathways.