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Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I

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Florescu,  Anna Maria
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Jülicher,  Frank
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Cojoc, G., Florescu, A. M., Krull, A., Klemm, A. H., Pavin, N., Jülicher, F., et al. (2016). Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I. Scientific Reports, 6: 25736. doi:10.1038/srep25736.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-D942-2
Abstract
Kinetochores are protein complexes on the chromosomes, whose function as linkers between spindle microtubules and chromosomes is crucial for proper cell division. The mechanisms that facilitate kinetochore capture by microtubules are still unclear. In the present study, we combine experiments and theory to explore the mechanisms of kinetochore capture at the onset of meiosis I in fission yeast. We show that kinetochores on homologous chromosomes move together, microtubules are dynamic and pivot around the spindle pole, and the average capture time is 3-4 minutes. Our theory describes paired kinetochores on homologous chromosomes as a single object, as well as angular movement of microtubules and their dynamics. For the experimentally measured parameters, the model reproduces the measured capture kinetics and shows that the paired configuration of kinetochores accelerates capture, whereas microtubule pivoting and dynamics have a smaller contribution. Kinetochore pairing may be a general feature that increases capture efficiency in meiotic cells.