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Vesicles-on-a-chip: A universal microfluidic platform for the assembly of liposomes and polymersomes.

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Petit,  Julien
Group Dynamics of fluid and biological interfaces, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Polenz,  Ingmar
Max Planck Research Group Droplets, Membranes and Interfaces, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Herminghaus,  Stephan
Group Granular matter and irreversibility, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Bäumchen,  Oliver
Group Dynamics of fluid and biological interfaces, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Petit, J., Polenz, I., Baret, J.-C., Herminghaus, S., & Bäumchen, O. (2016). Vesicles-on-a-chip: A universal microfluidic platform for the assembly of liposomes and polymersomes. The European Physical Journal E, 39(6): 59. doi:10.1140/epje/i2016-16059-8.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-DAA0-8
Abstract
In this study, we present a PDMS-based microfluidic platform for the fabrication of both liposomes and polymersomes. Based on a double-emulsion template formed in flow-focusing configuration, monodisperse liposomes and polymersomes are produced in a controlled manner after solvent extraction. Both types of vesicles can be formed from the exact same combination of fluids and are stable for at least three months under ambient storage conditions. By tuning the flow rates of the different fluid phases in the flow-focusing microfluidic design, the size of the liposomes and polymersomes can be varied over at least one order of magnitude. This method offers a versatile tool for future studies, e.g., involving the encapsulation of biological agents and the functionalization of artificial cell membranes, and might also be applicable for the controlled fabrication of hybrid vesicles.