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Annotated Gene and Proteome Data Support Recognition of Interconnections Between the Results of Different Experiments in Space Research

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Bauer,  Johann
Scientific Service Groups, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Bauer, J., Wehland, M., Pietsch, J., Sickmann, A., Weber, G., & Grimm, D. (2016). Annotated Gene and Proteome Data Support Recognition of Interconnections Between the Results of Different Experiments in Space Research. Microgravity Science and Technology, 28(3), 357-365. doi:10.1007/s12217-015-9451-z.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-1E49-E
Abstract
In a series of studies, human thyroid and endothelial cells exposed to real or simulated microgravity were analyzed in terms of changes in gene expression patterns or protein content. Due to the limitation of available cells in many space research experiments, comparative and control experiments had to be done in a serial manner. Therefore, detected genes or proteins were annotated with gene names and SwissProt numbers, in order to allow searches for interconnections between results obtained in different experiments by different methods. A crosscheck of several studies on the behavior of cytoskeletal genes and proteins suggested that clusters of cytoskeletal components change differently under the influence of microgravity and/or vibration in different cell types. The result that LOX and ISG15 gene expression were clearly altered during the Shenzhou-8 spaceflight mission could be estimated by comparison with the results of other experiments. The more than 100-fold down-regulation of LOX supports our hypothesis that the amount and stability of extracellular matrix have a great influence on the formation of three-dimensional aggregates under microgravity. The approximately 40-fold up-regulation of ISG15 cannot yet be explained in detail, but strongly suggests that ISGylation, an alternative form of posttranslational modification, plays a role in longterm cultures.