English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Pseudomorphic Transformation of Organometal Halide Perovskite Using the Gaseous Hydrogen Halide Reaction

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons198175

Chen,  Kun
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons133027

Deng,  Xiaohui
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons58578

Goddard,  Richard
Service Department Lehmann (EMR), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons59060

Tüysüz,  Harun
Research Group Tüysüz, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Chen, K., Deng, X., Goddard, R., & Tüysüz, H. (2016). Pseudomorphic Transformation of Organometal Halide Perovskite Using the Gaseous Hydrogen Halide Reaction. Chemistry of Materials, 28(15), 5530-5537. doi:10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02233.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-25DF-0
Abstract
Halide exchange is a facile method of adjusting the band gap and optimizing the performance of organometal halide perovskite. During the halide exchange processes, preserving the crystallinity and morphology of highly crystalline materials will be desirable for preparing novel materials with outstanding performance. In this study, the gasous hydrogen halides were used as reactants for halide exchange processes. The mutual conversions among three halides for condense films were realized. Moreover, perovskite inverse opals and perovskite single crystals were also adopted as substrates to illustrate the morphology preservation and crystallinity preservation, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra demonstrated the segregation when smaller ions were substituted by larger ions. Scanning electron microscopy displayed the direct evidence for morphology preservation during the transformation. For the first time, single crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed the single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation from bromide to chloride analogy, which demonstrated that the presented method can preserve the crystalline framework of large-sized perovskite during the halide exchange.